DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SERVICES DOGS CAN PROVIDE


SERVICE DOGS

Per the Americans with Disabilities Act of 2010 (ADA), a service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Service Dogs are not considered pets and require extensive specialized training.

THERAPY DOGS

This type of dog provides therapy for with individuals who may or may not have disabilities.  Handlers may use the dog themselves or are handled by someone who wants to bring the benefits of Animal Assisted Therapy to others.  The dog is usually the personal pet of the handler. Once Therapy Dog Teams are certified they can provide therapy at locations such as:

·         Hospitals and Mental Health Facilities

·         Nursing / Retirement Homes

·         Schools and Libraries


COMPANION DOGS

The companion dog is a non-working dog.  It provides companionship as a pet rather than doing specific tasks to assist someone disabled or provide therapy.   Although companion dogs don’t require specialized training, the best experience with a pet includes understanding basic commands, house training, and socialization.